Songwriters: 5 Keys To Building A Better Song Catalog

 

SongCatalog-Songtown

Several SongTownian’s have recently asked the question, “what’s the best way to build a song catalog?” Here are a some key things I’ve learned over the years after writing for several major publishing companies and building a new catalog at each.

Write, write, write!

There is no substitute for this. A catalog is a collection of songs. You need to write everyday if possible. But at least as often as you can! This not only helps you become a better writer, but also gives you more variety material which increases the odds that you’ll have the right song for a particular project.

Don’t write just one type or style of song.

A great catalog has an array of subject matter, tempos, emotions, and styles. The goal is to have a song you or your publisher can pitch in every situation. If an artist is looking for an uptempo party song- you got it covered. If an artist is looking for a message song with deeper lyric about the state of the world- you got it covered. You see where I’m going with this. It doesn’t happen overnight obviously, it takes time, but this is something you do by design.

Write outside yourself.

Write a little more about the world around you and a little less about your own small world. You will build a catalog faster by writing about life around you. For example- you may be struggling with a divorce for two years; if you spend two years writing only about your struggles then you ONLY have songs to pitch to an artist going through a divorce or wanting to sing about it. If you write about life around you, perhaps something you see on the news, something your waitress says at dinner, or something a friend is going through, then you can pitch your songs to all kinds of projects. You can still write about what you are going through but why limit yourself?

Co-write.

This is extremely helpful in building a catalog and increasing your the chances of success from that catalog. If you make regular appointments to co-write, you are more likely to write that day. Someone else is expecting you to show up and do your part, so you are less likely to get distracted by other things that are demanding your attention. An extra benefit to co-writing is there are two or three people when the song is completed who are working to get that song recorded and not just you alone.

Mix it up.

Write a mix of contemporary and classic. I always focus the majority of my time writing on the cutting edge. It’s where the new exciting stuff happens. It’s where I learn the most and explore new directions. It’s what most artists are looking to record. But my publisher will also come to me and say from time to time that so-n-so artist is looking for an old school song or retro feel. I need those too. The simple rule I use is this- if it’s a great idea that needs to be written in a classic style I will do it. If it’s just an “okay idea” that wants to be written in a retro style I don’t bother.

 

So here are a few of the basic points I keep in mind each time I am starting to build a new catalog. I’m about 6,000 plus songs into it- and it’s worked well for me and many of my co-writers!  Write on! Clay

clay-mills-songtown

Clay Mills is a 10-time hit songwriter and co-founder of SongTownUSA

 

9 thoughts on “Songwriters: 5 Keys To Building A Better Song Catalog

  1. Is that a typo? 6000 songs?! I have to ask how that is even possible. And over what period of time? Many of our greatest songwriters only wrote HUNDREDS of songs in their entire lifetime!

  2. Hi, that was helpful but I was wondering if a person can only write lyrics and never perform a song or even play eany instruments ( because I am terrible at both) in order to gett my writing out there? and if they can do you know what the succes rate is on that?

  3. Yes Mikey, a good lyricist is very valuable. SongTown’s co-founder Marty Dodson is a lyricist and is having major success as a writer. The key will be co-writing with good music writers. you can find them in the SongTown community. Most of our members co-write.

    Cheers, Clay

  4. Hey Clay! Great read! I about fainted when you said 6,000 songs, but when you mentioned over 30 years, I can see that. Quite the achievement. I am trying to challenge myself to complete at least 1 song a week for the year. This would be a huge jump up for me as I’ve never written that many songs in my life. I was wondering if all the songs that you include in that 6,000 are completely finished with music, melody, etc? Also, am I not shooting high enough on completing at least one song a week to start? Should I be writing more? I’m afraid if I go too quickly, the writing won’t be as good, but at the same time I need to build up my collection of songs. Again, thanks for your wisdom!

  5. Hi Clay
    Being a guitarist for a large country night club in Clovis Ca for years. I’ve seen what songs work and what doesn’t. I written a song called Chika Boom Boom, I think hits the mark for party song. Most publishers don’t accept outside material, any ideas ?

    1. Yes, you need to get involved with a songwriting community. Co-write with other writers, meet publishers, and producers, etc. All these things Songtown can help with.

      Clay

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